DiskAccess NT - Frequently
Asked Support Questions

  • How do I know if I have the latest version of DiskAccess?
  • When I install DiskAccess, the Installation Options dialog shows This choice will use 0 KB of space on your disk - for the compact option. That doesn't make any sense.
  • I have enabled locking on all of my clients, but when I try to access a file with two different clients, I get no warnings or errors. How can this be?
  • I have enabled locking on my client, and now it runs very slowly. Why is this?
  • The file/directory name, which I created appears to be truncated when I get a directory listing. What happened?
  • How does DiskAccess obtain the list of NFS servers displayed when the user clicks on NFS Network from Network Neighborhood?
  • Application XYZ (or everything) has slowed down. Why? It takes me 3 seconds to do anything. Why? I can never get mounted to certain NFS servers. Why?
  • I have DiskAccess loaded on my laptop computer and use it to dial in to the office. I have to wait about 4 minutes during login before DiskAccess pops up a message box saying that the NFS login has failed. How can I get rid of this delay?
  • I don't like that solution. I use DiskAccess on my computer at home, which also functions as a fax modem. If there is a power failure and the system reboots, login is now halted until someone comes along and dismisses the login failure box. Is there a way to get rid of it altogether?
  • I have a server running NIS+ and my NIS domain names that have the form of yp.wright.gov. DiskAccess NIS Authentication doesn't seem to work. What is the problem?
  • What are credentials? Which credentials would I use if I am browsing the Network Neighborhood?
  • I can't authenticate or print because my NFS server does not have PCNFSD. Where can I get PCNFSD for my server system?
  • Do you have any examples of setting up PCNFSD on a server?

  • How do I know if I have the latest version of DiskAccess?

    A. Use the About utility to determine the version you are running. Then connect to the Intergraph Web site and check the version there. Using a web browser, connect to www.ingr.com\nfs. Select DiskAccess and follow the links to obtain the latest software.


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  • When I install DiskAccess, the Installation Options dialog shows This choice will use 0 KB of space on your disk for the compact option. That doesn't make any sense.

    A. The installation program first calculates the amount of space needed for each file to be delivered with the installation option you selected. Then it looks to see if any of the files already exist in the installation directory on your system. If so, it subtracts the size of the existing file from the size of the new file. If files in the version you are installing are smaller than the older version currently on your system, the message could even show the disk space needed as a negative number.

  • I have enabled locking on all of my clients, but when I try to access a file with two different clients, I get no warnings or errors. How can this be?

    A. In addition to enabling locking on the clients, locking must be available and enabled on the server being accessed. The lock manager on the server must also support Network Lock Manager version 3 or greater because this is the only version that supports PC type lock requests.


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  • I have enabled locking on my client and now it runs very slowly. Why is this?

    A. Enabling locking will slow the client down in any case because of the extra network traffic required to support locking. There are cases where the slow down could be extreme, however. There are two reasons this could happen. Either locking is not enabled on the server being accessed, or the server does not support Network Lock Manager version 3 or greater. In both of these cases, the client is attempting to contact the lock manager (version 3) on every access, timing out, and retrying. This behavior is required if the client is to recover automatically from a server crash.

  • The file/directory name which I created appears to be truncated when I get a directory listing. What happened?

    A. Although the DiskAccess client is capable of supporting long file/directory names, the server may not support long file/directory names. In many cases, the server may truncate the name when creating or renaming files and directories.


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  • How does DiskAccess obtain the list of NFS servers displayed when the user clicks on NFS Network from Network Neighborhood?

    A. The DiskAccess Network Provider DLL periodically issues a network broadcast to request a reply from each NFS server on the network. The name of each server that responds to this broadcast is placed in a list. This list is displayed when an application browses the NFS Network.

    By default, the DiskAccess Network Provider issues this broadcast at system startup and again every five minutes. A new list of servers is generated with each broadcast. In this manner servers that are no longer responding are eliminated from the list, and new servers are added to the list.

    DiskAccess may be configured to only issue the broadcast once, at system startup. This method reduces the amount of network traffic. However, the NFS server list will never be updated and, therefore, may become inaccurate if servers are removed from or added to the network.

    DiskAccess may be configured to only issue the broadcast when an application attempts to browse the NFS Network. This provides the most up-to-date list of NFS servers and only generates network traffic upon demand. However, this technique causes the browsing application to wait for the list to be generated.

    There is a configurable time-out value that specifies the length of time the DiskAccess Network Provider will wait to receive replies from NFS servers responding to the broadcast. By default this time-out value is set to 15 seconds. This long time-out period allows servers that are slow to respond, such as servers on distant LANs, to be included in the list. If DiskAccess is configured to only broadcast upon demand it is recommended that this time-out value be set to one second. Although this will prevent slow responders from being added to the list, this will improve the browse response time. These parameters can be set on the Browsing page of the DiskAccess configuration dialog.


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  • Application XYZ (or everything) has slowed down. Why? It takes me 3 seconds to do anything. Why? I can never get mounted to certain NFS servers. Why?

    A. In the registry, there is a value called "FirstContact" under the key:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Intergraph\DiskAccess\CurrentVersion\Default

    The number contained in "FirstContact" is the time to wait for an initial response when attempting to contact a new machine. The value is in tenths of a second and has a default value of 30 (3 seconds). If a machine has been removed from the net or doesn't support NFS it will take 3 seconds for DiskAccess to error out. If you have placed a bunch of (now defunct) UNC names in your path, e.g., PATH=\\oldnode1\path;\\deadnode\path123;\\lamebox2\bindir;c:\winnt, then DiskAccess will time-out on each UNC name (3 seconds each) for every time the command prompt searches your path. But it gets worse. Windows Networking tries first and it may take up to 6 seconds to time-out.

    A similar thing can happen with any application with a stale UNC name. If you mistype the nodename in the "Map Network Drive" box or have a stale Windows NT shortcut ("\\deadnode\netpath") "FirstContact" determines the amount of time before DiskAccess gives up trying to contact that machine. Add this to the Windows Networking time-out and you have spelled SLOW!

    The best solution is to remove invalid UNC names from your PATH and applications. If not possible you can tune the value of "FirstContact" to time-out quicker.

    Note that a small value for "FirstContact" may not allow NFS connections to remote nodes (across the Internet; next door but across a slow link) or to NFS servers that are slow (being saturated with network traffic).


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  • I have DiskAccess loaded on my laptop computer and use it to dial in to the office. I have to wait about 4 minutes during login before DiskAccess pops up a message box saying that the NFS login has failed. How can I get rid of this delay?

    A. The delay occurs because DiskAccess is trying to contact the PCNFSD or NIS server for NFS login authentication, but it is not yet available. Eventually, a time-out will occur and DiskAccess will return the login failure message. To avoid the delay, invoke the DiskAccess configuration dialog from the Control Panel and remove the authentication server name. If there is no server name present, DiskAccess will immediately return a login failure without attempting to contact the server. (NOTE: This means that all subsequent NFS logins that use the configured defaults will fail.)


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  • I don't like that solution. I use DiskAccess on my computer at home, which also functions as a fax modem. If there is a power failure and the system reboots, login is now halted until someone comes along and dismisses the login failure box. Is there a way to get rid of it altogether?

    A. Yes. DiskAccess can be configured so that NFS login is not attempted until an NFS mount is attempted. However, this means that browse connections (those done through Network Neighborhood without a an associated drive letter) will use the factory defaults rather than the configured defaults. To configure DiskAccess to bypass NFS login at system login, invoke the DiskAccess configuration dialog from the Control Panel and clear the Authenticate At System Logon check box.

  • I have a server running NIS+ and my NIS domain names that have the form of "yp.wright.gov". DiskAccess NIS Authentication doesn't seem to work. What is the problem?

    A. As far as DiskAccess NIS Authentication goes, it doesn't do any syntax checking on the domainname that a user had typed in. Since DiskAccess is talking NIS, NIS+ server simply can't respond. The server needs to be configured so that it runs in NIS Compatibility mode.


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  • What are credentials? Which credentials would I use if I am browsing the Network Neighborhood?

    A. Default user credentials can be set only through DiskAccess Configuration from the Control Panel after manually logging in as the user. Each mapped drive can have alternate credentials by configuring through the DiskAccess Configuration dialog while mapping the network drive, but the alternate credentials will not be saved other than for that mapped drive.

    UNC connections will use default user credentials including browsing in the Network Neighborhood, and thus if you would like to run a service using a particular user's credentials, you will have to manually log in as the user and set the default user credentials for the user through the DiskAccess Configuration dialog in the Control Panel.

    If you haven't configured your Default user Credential or failed to configure during login, your UID and GID will be -2 and -1, respectively.

    While using OLE applications, all mapped drive letters will revert back to UNC names, and UNC connections WILL NOT carry the alternate credentials which were set for the mapped drive. They will use the default user credentials.


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  • I can't authenticate or print because my NFS server does not have PCNFSD. Where can I get PCNFSD for my server system?

    A. PCNFSD has been ported to many different platforms. The following is a partial list of FTP sites for different versions:

    Platform, Location

    • SunOS 4.x, Solaris bcm.tmc.edu
    • Solbourne src.doc.ic.ac.uk
    • NeXTStep ftp.york.ac.uk:/pun/pv/pc-nfs/RPC.pcnfs/*
    • Ultrix 4.2 bcm.tmc.edu
    • IRIX/SYSV sgi.sgi.com:/support/pcnfsd.sysV [unsupported] ftp.york.ac.uk:/pub/pc/pc-nfs/RPC.pcnfsd/*
    • IBM AIX 3.2 Call IBM and ask for PTF# U412556,
    • IBM AIX 3.2.1 Call IBM and ask for PTF# U419359,
    • IBM AIX 3.2.3 Call IBM and ask for PTF# U414701
    • IBM MVS Call IBM and ask for PTF# UY84244 [pcnfsd v1 only]
    • MIPS ftp.york.ac.uk:/pub/pc/pc-nfs/RPC.pcnfsd/*
    • OpenVMS 5.5 DEC TCP/IP v3.0 [product]
    • SCO Unix v3.2 SCO NFS [product]
    • HP 9000 [HP-UX 9.x] HP-UX NFS [product]
    • There is a combined version of PCNFSD v2 for the following systems: Sun, Ultrix, MIPS, SGI, BSD, SVR4 which is available
    • from ftp.york.ac.uk:/pub/pc-nfs/RPC.pcnfs/pcnfsd.tar.Z.


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  • Do you have any examples of setting up PCNFSD on a server?

    A. Examples are included below for the following NFS servers:

    1. Windows NT Servers running Intergraph's DiskShare
    2. SunOS 4.x
    3. Solaris 2.x (SunOS 5.X)

    Windows NT Servers running Intergraph's DiskShare

    The Intergraph DiskShare product lets Windows NT systems act as NFS servers, making directories and printers available to NFS clients. All printers that are configured on a system running DiskShare are available to clients using PCNFSD printing; however, the printers cannot be browsed because DiskShare does not implement PCNFSD version 2 completely. PC-NFS clients will need to specify the server name and printer name explicitly to connect to a printer on a DiskShare server.

    If you want the PC-NFS daemon (PCNFSD) to start automatically on a DiskShare server when the system is booted, perform the following steps:

    1. In Control Panel, open the Services icon.
    2. From the list of available services in the Services control panel, select pcnfsd; then select the Startup button.
    3. In the Service dialog that is displayed, select a Startup Type of Automatic. Selecting Manual will require you to start PCNFSD manually each time you reboot the system.
    4. Close the Service dialog; then close the Services control panel.

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    SunOS 4.x Operating System

    It is recommended that the user refer to the SunOS documentation for LPR and the delivered manual page for rpc.pcnfsd(8) for more complete instructions on how to configure PCNFSD on the SUN Operating System. The following is a brief summary of the steps required. To load the rpc.pcnfsd file on the Sun machine:

    1. Copy the file rpc.pcnfsd to /usr/etc/rpc.pcnfsd
    2. Make sure the permissions and ownership of the file are as follows:
      -rwxr-xr-x 1 root 65536 Mar 17 1994 /usr/etc/rpc.pcnfsd
    3. Add the following to the /etc/rc.local file after the entry for ifconfig -a:
      #
      if [ -f /usr/etc/rpc.pcnfsd ]; then
      /usr/etc/rpc.pcnfsd -s /usr/spool/pcnfs;
      echo 'rpc.pcnfsd' > /dev/console
      #
    4. Create the following file:

      /usr/spool/pcnfs


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    Authentication: When pcnfsd receives a PCNFSD_AUTH or PCNFSD2_AUTH request, it will "log in" the user by validating the username and password and returning the corresponding user ID, group IDs, home directory, and default file permissions (umask). At this time, pcnfsd will also append a record to the /etc/wtmp database. To record PC "logins" in this way, you should add a line with the following format to the pcnfsd.conf file:

    wtmp yes (The pcnfsd.conf file is delivered with the value of wtmp set to "no.")

    Printing: The pcnfsd daemon supports a printing model that uses NFS to transfer the actual print data from the client to the server. The client system issues a PCNFSD_PR_INIT or PCNFSD2_PR_INIT request, and the server returns the path to a spool directory which is exported by NFS and which the client may use. The pcnfsd daemon creates a subdirectory for each of its clients: the parent directory is normally /usr/spool/pcnfsd and the subdirectory is the hostname of the client system. To use a different parent directory, add a line with the following format to the pcnfsd.conf file:

    spooldir path (i.e. spooldir /home/spool)

    Once a client has mounted the spool directory using NFS and has transferred print data to a file in this directory, it issues a PCNFSD_PR_START or PCNFSD2_PR_START request. The pcnfsd daemon handles this, and most other print related requests, by constructing a command based on the printing services of the server operating system and executing the command using the identity of the PC user. Since this involves set-user-id privileges, pcnfsd must be run as root.

    Every print request from the client includes the name of the printer that is to be used. To pcnfsd, a printer appears as either a destination serviced by the system print spooler, or as a virtual printer. Refer to the SunOS lpc(8) manual page for more information on setting up the system print spooler to handle a new printer. Virtual printers, known only to pcnfsd clients, are defined in the /etc/pcnfsd.conf file by a line with the following format:

    printer name alias-for-command

    The printer name parameter is the name of the printer you want to define. The alias-for parameter specifies the name of a "real" printer which corresponds to this printer. (You can define up to 16 virtual printers.) For example, a request to display the queue for printer name will be translated into the corresponding request for the printer alias-for. If you have defined a printer in such a way that there is no "real" printer to which it corresponds, use a single dash (-) for this field. (See the example for the printer named "test" below.) The command parameter that will be executed whenever a file is printed on printer name. This command is executed by the Bourne shell using the -c option. For complex operations you should construct an executable shell program and invoke that in command. Within command the following tokens will be replaced dynamically by pcnfsd:

    $FILE Replaced by the full path name of the print data file. When the command has been executed, the file will be unlinked.

    $USER Replaced by the user name of the user logged into the client system.
    $HOST Replaced by the host name of the client system.
    $PRINTER Replaced by the real printer name.

    Consider the following example pcnfsd.conf file:

    printer aliasfuji fuji lpr -P fuji -J $USER -C $HOST $FILE
    printer test - /usr/bin/cp $FILE /usr/tmp/$HOST-$USER

    If a PC client system prints a job on the printer "aliasfuji," pcnfsd will execute the specified print job on the printer "fuji." If the client requests a list of the print queues for the printer "aliasfuji" the pcnfsd daemon will translate this into a request for a listing for the printer "fuji."

    The printer "test" is used only for testing. Any file sent to this printer will be copied into /usr/tmp. Any request to list the queue, check the status, etc. of printer "test" will be rejected because the alias-for has been specified as "-".


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    Solaris 2.x (SunOS 5.x) Operating System

    It is recommended that the user refer to the Solaris documentation for LP and LPR, and the manual page delivered with the rpc.pcnfsd(1M) daemon for more complete instructions on configuring PCNFSD on Solaris (SunOS 5.x) systems. The following is a brief summary of the steps required:

    To install pcnfsd:

    1. Copy the file rpc.pcnfsd to /usr/lib/nfs.
    2. chmod 777 and chown bin chgrp bin on the above file.
    3. Copy the file pcnfs to /etc/init.d/pcnfs.
    4. chmod 777, chown root, chgrp other
    5. Make a hard link to /etc/rc3.d and call the file S32pcnfs
    # ln /etc/init.d/pcnfs /etc/rc3.d/S32pcnfs

    Authentication: When pcnfsd receives a PCNFSD_AUTH or PCNFSD2_AUTH request, it will "log in" the user by validating the username and password and returning the corresponding user ID, group IDs, home directory, and default file permissions (umask). At this time, pcnfsd will also append a record to the /etc/wtmp database. To record PC "logins" in this way, you should add a line with the following format to the pcnfsd.conf file:

    wtmp yes (The pcnfsd.conf file is delivered with the value of wtmp set to "no.")


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    Printing: The pcnfsd daemon supports a printing model that uses NFS to transfer the actual print data from the client to the server. The client system issues a PCNFSD_PR_INIT or PCNFSD2_PR_INIT request, and the server returns the path to a spool directory which is exported by NFS and which the client may use. The pcnfsd daemon creates a subdirectory for each of its clients: the parent directory is normally /usr/spool/pcnfsd (for the LPR print system) or /usr/spool/lp/pcnfs (for the LP print system) and the subdirectory is the hostname of the client system. To use a different parent directory, add a line with the following format to the pcnfsd.conf file:

    spooldir path (i.e. spooldir /usr/printspool)

    Once a client has mounted the spool directory using NFS and has transferred print data to a file in this directory, it issues a PCNFSD_PR_START or PCNFSD2_PR_START request. The pcnfsd daemon handles this, and most other print related requests, by constructing a command based on the printing services of the server operating system and executing the command using the identity of the PC user. Since this involves set-user-id privileges, pcnfsd must be run as root.

    Every print request from the client includes the name of the printer that is to be used. To pcnfsd, a printer appears as either a destination serviced by the system print spooler, or as a virtual printer. Refer to the lpadmin(1M) or lpc(1B) manual pages for more information on setting up the system print spooler to handle a new printer. Virtual printers, known only to pcnfsd clients, are defined in the /etc/pcnfsd.conf file by a line with the following format:

    printer name alias-for-command

    The printer name parameter is the name of the printer you want to define. The alias-for parameter specifies the name of a "real" printer which corresponds to this printer. (You can define up to 16 virtual printers.) For example, a request to display the queue for printer name will be translated into the corresponding request for the printer alias-for. If you have defined a printer in such a way that there is no "real" printer to which it corresponds, use a single dash (-) for this field. (See the example for the printer named "test" below.) The command parameter that will be executed whenever a file is printed on printer name. This command is executed by the Bourne shell using the -c option. For complex operations you should construct an executable shell program and invoke that in command. Within command the following tokens will be replaced dynamically by pcnfsd:

    $FILE Replaced by the full path name of the print data file. When the command has been executed, the file will be unlinked.

    $USER Replaced by the user name of the user logged into the client system.

    $HOST Replaced by the host name of the client system.

    $PRINTER Replaced by the real printer name.

    Consider the following example pcnfsd.conf file:

    printer aliasfuji fuji lpr -P fuji -J $USER -C $HOST $FILE

    printer test - /usr/bin/cp $FILE /usr/tmp/$HOST-$USER

    If a PC client system prints a job on the printer "aliasfuji," pcnfsd will execute the specified print job on the printer "fuji." If the client requests a list of the print queues for the printer "aliasfuji" the pcnfsd daemon will translate this into a request for a listing for the printer "fuji." The printer "test" is used only for testing. Any file sent to this printer will be copied into /usr/tmp. Any request to list the queue, check the status, etc... of printer "test" will be rejected because the alias-for has been specified as "-".


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    Intergraph Corporation